Libra Marches on Following the Association’s First Member Meeting

The Libra Association – a consortium of companies who governs over Facebook’s proposed stablecoin Libra – held its first meeting on Monday in Geneva, Switzerland.

Following the meeting in Geneva, the twenty-one organizations formally signed the Libra Association charter as well as named its board of directors and formalized the consortium’s executive team.

As such, the five-member board is comprised of Calibra cofounder David Marcus, Andreessen Horowitz general partner Katie Haun, Xapo CEO Wences Cesares, PayU general counsel Patrick Ellis, and Kiva chief strategy officer Matthew Davie. PayPal veterans Bertrand Perez, Dante Disaprte, and Kurt Hemecker will comprise the Association’s executive team.

Most major decisions will require a majority vote of the ruling council, whilst proposed changes to membership or management of the reserve must pass by a two-thirds majority.

In addition to Calibra, the association consists of Coinbase, Xapo, Anchorage, Bison Trails, Creative Destruction Lab, Andreessen Horowitz, Thrive Capital, Ribbit Capital, Union Square Ventures, Breakthrough Initiatives, Illiad, Vodafone, Farfetch, Uber, Lyft, Kiva, Mercy Corps, Women’s World Banking, Spotify and PayU, according to a press release.

The news follows a string of significant departures of major companies such as Visa, PayPal, MasterCard, Stripe, eBay and Booking from the Facebook-led stablecoin project. Most announced their withdrawals from Libra citing concerns over the regulatory backlash faced by the project.

Still, according to the Libra Association more than 1,500 institutions have expressed interest in joining the project, with 180 meeting the organization’s membership criteria. In June, Facebook claimed a consortium of 100 companies would back the cryptocurrency project at launch.

However, the association shared no updates regarding those plans nor the exact launch date. Although Facebook initially targeted an early 2020 launch date, recent statements by CEO Zuckerberg have put this timeline into doubt.

Meanwhile, financial regulators around the globe have expressed their opposition to the project, citing fears that Libra could destabilize the global monetary order. Ministers in France and Germany stated they were against Libra and India announced that Libra may not even be legal in the country. Most recently, U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) called for a moratorium on the project until all regulatory questions could be cleared.

However, Calibra’s Marcus has claimed that these fears are misplaced. He recently testified before the U.S. Congress, trying to dispel the concerns of both the Senate Banking Committee and the House Financial Services Committee.  Mark Zuckerberg is also slated to testify about the project before the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee.

Despite regulatory backlash, the Libra Association remains optimistic about going forth with the project. Dante Disparte, the head of policy and communications at Libra Association, stated that the recent flight of major backers is “a correction; it’s not a setback.” Nonetheless, he admitted that any delay to the launch will be a result of its regulatory issues, rather than technical concerns.